My Opinions on the Latest Anime (Summer 2014 Edition)

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What I’m currently watching: Akame ga Kill!, Ao Haru Ride, Barakamon, Free! Eternal Summer, Gekkan Shoujo Nozaki-kun, Haikyuu!!, JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure: Stardust Crusaders, Kuroshitsuji: Book of Circus, Sword Art Online II, Tokyo Ghoul and Zankyou no Terror. (As of August 01 2014)

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Sexism in the Anime Fandom: A Case Study of a Tumblr User

A "stereotypical" female anime fan

A “stereotypical” female otaku

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In my last post, I discussed my stance on sexism in male otaku fandom. I described my ambivalence about my own fan activities and how I have always felt complicit in sexist attitudes despite my desire for gender equality. It is certainly easy to point out that anime fanservice objectifies women (among other things) and in doing so turn your critical eye away from yourself.

This time, I want to focus on the female anime fan’s perspective. In doing so, I hope to show that sexism in the anime fandom lies far beyond what is shown in anime itself. The sharp division between anime communities “for boys” (i.e. Reddit and 4chan) and anime communities “for girls” (i.e. tumblr and fanfiction sites) does not help. There is a distinct lack of open communication between both genders online. This enforces gender stereotyping on both ends.

This post is a collaboration with my friend AquaJet. She is an insider of both female otaku culture and tumblr culture. I decided to feature her writing on my blog because I feel this is a perspective that needs to be shared to a wider audience.

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“Feminist Otaku” = An Oxymoron?

A "feminist otaku"

A “feminist otaku”

I have been thinking a lot about feminism lately. Specifically, I have been thinking about how gender politics relate to the anime fandom. It’s widely acknowledged that otaku culture is sexist and that the vast majority of anime marginalise women by objectifying or “Othering” them. But what about the individual people involved? Ordinary people like you and me who don’t necessarily think women are inferior to men but still involve themselves with anime culture anyway?

So I got to thinking… am I sexist for being an otaku? Am I a big, fat hypocrite for calling myself a “feminist” while also calling fictional female characters my waifus and buying merchandise featuring anime girls in sexual poses? This isn’t just a matter of enjoying ecchi anime – this is stuff I actually do, even if I intend it jokingly or ironically. Lately, I have been doing some hard thinking about what it means to be a “feminist” and what it means to be an “otaku” and I wonder if the two are mutually exclusive.

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Kirito is an Asshole

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Kirito is a really overpowered guy who attracts all the ladies by not doing very much in particular. I think he’s an asshole. But I kind of like him.

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Froggy’s Top Anime: #10 Yahari Ore no Seishun Love Come wa Machigatteiru

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When Oregairu first aired in the spring season of 2013, I don’t think anyone was expecting too much out of it. A light novel adaptation with a stupidly long title that translates to “My Youth Romantic Comedy is Wrong as Expected”? What sparkling originality. I was looking forward to the show as soon as it was announced because of my partiality towards bullshit otaku romcoms, but I wasn’t expecting anything deep or profound.

I certainly wasn’t expecting this to be the story that would most perfectly criticise my outlook on life. It challenged my snobbishness, my elitism, my cynicism about teenagers. Oregairu is the story that made me respect teen lit.

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I’m a Steph

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There are many reasons why Steph is the best character in No Game No Life, but the biggest and main reason is that I am a Steph myself.

(Warning: This post contains dirty humour, for what is a Steph without embarrassing sexual incidents?)

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The Current State of English Light Novels

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LN translation is in a similar place fansubbing was in before Crunchyroll and other forms of legal streaming came along. There aren’t too many light novels officially translated into English, and many series are out of print and discontinued. As a fan translator, I do my part in making Japanese LNs available in English, but I know that what I’m doing is actually illegal. But in many ways, it really can’t be helped, at least for now.

The good news is that the situation is changing, little by little. With more LNs being adapted into anime than ever before, people are taking notice of LNs (for better and for worse). Yen Press has recently licensed the guaranteed cash cow known as Sword Art Online, with other popular LNs like Kagerou Daze on the way. And with the shift from print books to Ebooks, LNs have a better chance of finding exposure at a cheaper price. The digital revolution has opened up possibilities for every literary subgenre  imaginable, so it’s not as if there is no market for LNs, even if they will remain niche for the foreseeable future.

Beyond translated LNs, there’s another type of English light novel, one that’s been eking out a humble living in the dark corners of the internet up until now: original English light novels, written by English-speaking anime fans. It’s this kind of LN I’ll be focusing on today.

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What’s K-Pop Got To Do With Anime Fandom?

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Picture is relevant, I swear.

WARNING: 2500+ word long post ahead.

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Anime Fandom and Growing Up “Asian”

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This is an autobiographical post.

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TOP 10 IMOUTOS OF ALL TIME

I did a collaboration post with Josh from Chromatic Aberration Everywhere. Together, we tackled the extremely important question of who the best imoutos are. You can marvel at our fine taste here.

I recommend this blog very strongly, by the way, especially if you enjoy analysis-heavy writing. Josh and I have influenced each other a lot over the past year or so, both as bloggers and as academics. While this is the first time we’ve directly collaborated on a post, it probably won’t be the last! We’ve also been working separately on essays about the nature of fandom and consuming media, so look forward to seeing some of that in the upcoming weeks.

Catch you later, my imoutos and otoutos!

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